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20100901
20100930
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that employers recruit from. and the result might surprise you. jennifer merit is the careers editor for "the wall street journal" and oversaw this particular survey. jennifer, thanks for joining us. tell us what you looked at and what you found. >> well, what we did is we surveyed recruiters from the biggest companies, public, private, non-profit, government organizations and asked them which schools they recruit at and which schools produce the best graduates overall as far as being prepared to work in the companies, succeed, academic prowess, et cetera. so what happened was, the list that we came up with, the top 25 out of the almost 500 companies who responded was primarily made up of state schools. so what we found was that they really liked these graduates who had all this academic preparedness and were well rounded in other ways. >> that leads me to this then. i want to pop this up, all of them except one, which is carnegie melon are publicly funded. tuition at carnegie this year is $42,000, but $15,000 at penn state. >> there's a couple things going on. people can really understand th
. there's a question about that. are two incomes always better than one? jennifer is ce of the family financial network. let me start out. it seems like a no brainer. you need more money, get two jobs. that's good. is it always good? >> it does seem like a no brainer. for many families it does make sense. at a time when there is so much insecurity about jobs and concerns of health care benefits. a lot of families use a second income to maybe save for a specific goal, like college or maybe even financing a business. >> there a lot of hidden costs with a second income. if you're not making enough, it can be a problem. >> you're right. that's the issue. becoming the victim of the dual income trap if you will. let's say the second person earns $50,000 in income. you have $10,000 to $15,000 going to taxes. that leads you with $35,000. we have clothing cost. we have transportation. maybe a car to get to our job. maybe we've got child care expenses. if you take those combined, they can easily come up to $15,000. that with wittle the net pay down to $20,000. then, of course, maybe you're thin
in a desperate attempt to save her family. this newly released bank surveillance video shows jennifer hawke-petit with drawing $15,000 from her bank in this small town of cheshire, connecticut. it was a monday morning july 23rd, 2007. about three miles away, something awful, something truly sinister was happening inside her home. her husband william was bound and gagged. and along with her two daughters haley and milkala was held hodge. she hoped the money would be enough for the two men who broke into their home the night before to save their lives. she reaches out but has to be discreet because one of the two alleged kidnappers was just outside. the bank manager quietly calls 911. 9:21, cheshire police learned of the hodge situation. >> we have a lady who is in our bank right now who says that her husband and children are being held at their house. the people are in a car outside the bank. she is getting $15,000, that if the police are told they will kill the children and the husband. she is petrified. >> reporter: minutes later she leaves the bank with the ransom money. >> they told her
as shocking now as when it all happened more than three years ago. >> reporter: jennifer hawks-petit nervously asking a bank teller for ransom money to save her family. she had no way of knowing she would be dead within an hour. >> we have a lady who is in our bank right now, who says that her husband and children are being held at their house. the people are in the car outside the bank. she's getting $15,000. to bring out to them. if the police are told, they will kill the children and the husband. >> reporter: the 911 call to police was made by the manager inside that bank branch. she told police she saw mrs. petit being driven away by someone else going in that direction. >> she said they've been very nice. and she knows they'll leave after they get the money. >> reporter: suspects joshua and steven hayes did leave. but only police say after allegedly strangling and raping mrs. hawkes-petit and their children. husband michael petit was beaten and tied up in the basement before the house was set on fire. he escaped. the only survivor. nagging questions remain about whether police could have
recruit from. jennifer, first of all, thanks for joining us. tell us what you looked at and what you found. >> what we did was we surveyed recruiters from the biggest companies, public, private. non-profits, government organizations. we asked them which schools they recruit at and which produce the best graduates overall, as far as being prepared to work in their companies, succeed, academic prowess. what happened was the list we came up with, the top 25 out of the almost 500 companies who responded was primarily made up of state schools. what we found was they really liked these graduates who had all this academic preparredness. >> i want to pop this up, the top ten, so our viewers can take a look at it. all except one are publicly funded. tuition is only about 15,000 at number one ranked penn state. >> first of all, companies now need people who can really understand their business. so you could be brilliant and come in with a great marketing idea, but if you don't know marketing analytic, that company's not going to get as much out of you. say for engineering, if you don't know how to d
jennifer. she also went to school online from the fifth grade through high school. now she is here at usc. you feel as though online education works. why? >> i think the structure of the school is a lot more similar to college than a regular school. i attended lecture once a week and then the rest of the readings were up to me. so i think i'm really well acclimated to college already. >> reporter: jennifer was the valedictorian of who are online graduating class of 450 students, kids she met for the first time at the graduation ceremony. give us something that you think you did miss out on, though. >> i really did miss out on the traditional social aspect of high school, like running to classes, eating lunch in the cafeteria, and just the entire action between people on a day-to-day basis. >> reporter: a study released last year by the department of education concluded that online learning is as effective as learning in a traditional classroom setting. at least in terms of academics. as different as it may seem, the formula for success online is the same as it is in class. students need t
they're doing. >> i couldn't do those moves. hello. jennifer grey did really well. >> made people cry. >> "dirty dancing" come on. the lady can shake it. >> all right. >> we'll shake it to break. [ male announcer ] set down your pencils. step away from the internet. schedule no meetings. hold all your phone calls. for the next hour, there will be no agenda. marie callender's invites you back to lunch, with a new line of fresh recipes. like chicken teriyaki with crisp water chestnuts. it steams to perfection in minutes, giving the fresh flavors and textures of a homemade meal. marie's new steamed meals. it's time to savor. >>> all right. big, big story on capitol hill today. less than two hours from now the senate plans a procedural vote on ending the
with here in the city. >> reporter: jennifer coffee said habitat is looking for 30 first-time home buyers. she said they won't be able to build unless they have a family. >> needing 30 families means that we're putting some homes on hold a little bit. >> reporter: in order to be eligible for a habitat home families have to meet the qualifications. coffee says the biggest hang-up? families' fear of taking on a mortgage. >> if a person is paying more than $400 in rent, they're throwing their money away. >> reporter: but coffee said a few habitat homes have gone into foreclosure, leaving them vacant. >> there is a mortgage payment that these families have to pay. the average is $350. so if, if they don't pay the $350, then unfortunately they can't stay. >> reporter: habitat said they hope it sends a message to low-income families, if they want a home, now is the time. >> all right. let's get you to the daily briefing. the white house davely briefing. white house spokesman robert gibbs offering comments on hurricane earl. >> we will let you know when that happens. yes, ma'am? >> do you have a
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8